department

Detail

506 S. Ellis

(417) 673-2254

Mission Statement

It is the Webb City Fire Department’s mission to educate and protect its citizens from the loss of life and property. We are dedicated to the public by constant training and preparation to meet the needs of the citizens of this great City.

​Council Packet March 13, 2017

​Council Packet March 13, 2017

​Carl Francis, City Administrator

P.O. Box 30

Webb City, MO

417-673-4651

cfrancis@webbcity.org

​The Webb City Farmer’s Market is now open for its summer hours. Check out the market’s website or Facebook page for more information!

​Kim Demoss, City Clerk

P.O. Box 30

Webb City, MO 64870

417-673-4651

kdemoss@webbcity.org

City Hall/ Fire Department

Fire History

The first Webb City Fire volunteer fire department was established in 1889 under the leadership of Fire Chief Henry Wonner. Webb City Fire Department became an all-paid department in 1899. This was also the first year the department received their first hose wagon and horses. In 1910 the citizens of Webb City voted on a bond issue to purchase the first auto fire apparatus and a ladder truck for $10,000.00 Both the auto and the ladder truck were on display at the International Association of Fire Chiefs Convention in Syracuse, New York prior to their delivery in the late summer and early fall of 1910. It was state of the art for it’s time with warning bells, headlights, hose reel and fire-fighting equipment. It came in vermillion red with gold leaf lettering. The Fire Department was housed in various locations until 1975. In 1975 the city purchased land behind the City Hall and built a new Fire Station. The department remained there until 2004 when the old station was replaced by new one at 506 S. Ellis Street. The new station has six drive thru bays and eight individual bedrooms. The station houses the newest Engine a Ferrara Pumper, two Freightliner Engines, one E One ladder Truck, F-350 Brush Truck, Ford F-150 Battalion Chiefs Truck, and the Chief’s vehicle. We also house two ambulances which are staffed by outside personnel. The department has a staff of 19 full-time personnel. The department is led by Fire Chief Andrew Roughton and Battalion Chief’s Jackie Clark, Mark Metsker, and Brett Pinion

Insurance Services Organization Rating

The ISO rating is the measuring tool used by Insurance Companies to set rates for Homeowner’s and Businesses based on our fire protection resources. The lower the rating the better the rates. After years of continued support from our City Council, City Management, Water Department, and Citizens the hard work of our fire department paid off with a notice from ISO that Webb City would have a Fire rating of Three (3) beginning June 1 2008.

We are currently replacing the sewer main in the alley between Oronogo Street, and Washington Street, from 13th Street to 15th Street. The alley will be closed at times, 14th Street will also be closed from Oronogo Street to Washington. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

110 E. Church, Webb City, Missouri

417-673-6297 (Public Works)

Wastewater Collections at this location

(Wastewater Treatment Facility located on North Madison)

The City of Webb City wastewater collection system consists of a total of 63 miles of pipe, 9 lift stations, and over 1000 manholes. This vital infra-structure is put in place to maintain sanitary conditions for the important residents of our city. This entire system has recently had its assets physical location and elevation recorded by a sophisticated GPS (Global Position System) unit so that this information can be added to a GIS (Geographic Information system) data base. This data base which includes electronic mapping will be invaluable to assist the waste water department in quickly finding covered manholes, and designing future main line replacements, and extensions of the collection system.

The wastewater collections department consists of a five man crew who professionally serve the residents by maintaining the system in the best possible condition they can. Their assignments are to inspect, clean, replace, and maintain our collection system. The crew is able to perform these duties repectively along with responding to emergency calls, and replacing broken down sections of sewer pipe. The crew utilizes several pieces of equipment to accomplish these great tasks which includes: a powerful rodding machine to break up tough roots, a powerful water powered jet truck, that also has a large 10 inch vacuum hose that cleans the lines and clears clogs of small roots and grease, a remote controlled camera to travel inside of sewer mains to inspect, and record the conditions of pipes, and manholes for cracks. To replace, and install new sewer mains the crew has procured a backhoe, an excavator, and two dump trucks. Under the direction of Director William Runkle this important work is orchestrated by Superintendent: John Pottorff, and Foreman: Darren Chitwood, along with three laborers. Between both Darren and John they have more than 55 years experience in the construction and utility industries. John has worked in both the construction, and municipal industries; Darren has worked in construction, municipal, and private sector utility industry for 30+ years.

This invaluable crew was assembled to help remediate one of the greatest challenges of collection systems everywhere across the country; caused by an aging infrastructure, and old outdated plumbing practices of the time. This challenge has an acronym called SSO’s and it stands for Sanitary Sewer Overflow; an unsanitary situation where, during high rain events, some singular locations in the system cannot fully contain both the waste water and rain water. During an SSO, the water will surcharge, or overflow through a manhole. This event is primarily caused by a situation with another acronym - I&I which stands for Inflow & Infiltration. Inflow is caused from storm water drains being connected to the sanitary sewer system instead of being connected to a separate storm water system. Infiltration is caused by pipes 50 to 100 years old or more, that are cracked and broken down which allows ground water to enter in to the collection system. During a rain event you could see how this could present a very big problem. Because of the potential public health hazard, residents are strongly
encouraged to call the wastewater department if they witness water discharging from a manhole.

We also contract with specialized companies who can install a permanent liner inside of the sewer main in areas where it makes more sense to line vs. digging the main up and replacing it. These are the more congested areas and where the sewer main is extremely deep in the ground.

For questions or concerns about our wastewater system please call 673-6297.

To see Webb City, Missouri’s Municipal Codes, CLICK HERE!

Have a plan & do not wait until the weather radio alerts or outdoor warning sirens sound to seek shelter away from your residence.


The FEMA Community storm shelters at Crowder College (600 South Ellis), Webb City High School-Cardinal Dome (621 North Madison), & at Madge T James Kindergarten Center (211 West Aylor) in Webb City along with the shelter at the Truman complex (810 North Highway D) in Oronogo and the shelter at the Carterville Elementary School (210 East Hall) will be opened before the outdoor warning sirens are sounded when Webb City is in the projected path of a National Weather Service issued Tornado Warning or Severe Weather Event with life threatening winds (in excess of 75 mph).

Smaller unmanned shelters will be opened the day of projected severe weather and they are located at 1060 North Madison (Webb City Public Works); 300 North College (Webb City Head Start); & Liberty & Daugherty (just north of the old Filling Station).

FEMA regulations do NOT allow for pets in any of the shelters; provisions will be made for service animals.
Stay tuned to your favorite weather news service for updates.

FEMA SHELTER LOCATIONS:

Webb City:
Crowder College – 600 South Ellis
Madge T. James Kindergarten Center – 211 West Aylor
Cardinal Dome at Webb City High School – 621 North Madison

Small Shelters: (transferred from the FEMA Housing)

1060 North Madison (Webb City Public Works)

300 North College (Webb City Head Start)

Liberty & Daugherty (just north of the old Filling Station)

Oronogo:
Truman Complex – 810 North Highway D

Carterville:
Carterville Elementary – 210 East Hall

The FEMA Community storm shelters will be opened before the outdoor warning sirens are sounded when Webb City is in the projected path of a National Weather Service issued Tornado Warning or Severe Weather Event with life threatening winds (in excess of 75 mph).

Have a plan & do not wait until the weather radio alerts or outdoor warning sirens sound to seek shelter away from your residence.

FEMA regulations do NOT allow for pets in any of the shelters; provisions will be made for service animals.

Stay tuned to your favorite weather news service for updates.

MISSION

Our mission is to expand, retain and advocate for our economic base, support our educational programs and promote the quality of life in our community.


  • Governed by a 20 member board of directors
  • 5-person executive committee that meets monthly
  • 9 committees to help carry out the mission of work
  • 2 Full Time Staff
Credit:Cardinal Scale - Designer: Asia Sansalone

WEBB CITY CHAMBER…100 YEARS OLD!



The Webb City Chamber is celebrating 100 Years in 2017 and as part of our celebration we had several chamber members submit designs for a logo and then had the membership vote for their favorite! So here is our official 100 Year Logo!!

What to Do During a Tornado

If you are under a tornado WARNING, seek shelter immediately!

FEMA Tornado Information Site

If you are in a structure (e.g. residence, small building, school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center, high-rise building) then go to a pre-designated shelter area such as a safe room, basement, storm cellar, or the lowest building level. If there is no basement, go to the center of an interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside. Get under a sturdy table and use your arms to protect your head and neck. Do not open windows.

If you are in a vehicle, trailer, or mobile home then get out immediately and go to the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building or a storm shelter. Mobile homes, even if tied down, offer little protection from tornadoes.

If you are outside with no shelter then lie flat in a nearby ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands. Be aware of the potential for flooding. Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location. Never try to outrun a tornado in urban or congested areas in a car or truck. Instead, leave the vehicle immediately for safe shelter. Watch out for flying debris. Flying debris from tornadoes causes most fatalities and injuries.

Tornado/Severe Weather Sheltering

Once the tornado sirens are sounded, an officer with the Webb City Police Department will open the Webb City Public Library at 101 South Liberty Street as an emergency storm shelter. An officer will remain at the shelter until the severe weather threat has passed.

Those wishing to open a new business in Webb City need to bring a completed Business License Application to City Hall located at 200 S. Main Street.​

WEBB CITY Population Statistics

11,165 (2015 Census Update)

Jasper County Population

116,398 (2015 Census Update)

Don’t miss Webb City’s Route 66 Cruise-A-Palooza on April 8, 2017! 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. - Live Music, Car Show, Carnival Rides, Petting Zoo, Pony Rides, Beer Garden and much more!

Checklist for Starting a Small Business in Webb City, MO

Owning and operating a small business can be a tremendously fulfilling and rewarding way of life, but it is not always an easy one. A great deal of thought and research should go into making a decision that will affect you and your family for a long time to come.

Consider that:

· The failure rate for new start-up businesses is high.

· If you need financing, you will be expected to provide 20% or more of the total funds and you will be ex-pected to personally guarantee repayment. Grants to start a for-profit

business enterprise are virtually non-existent. Even not-for-profit businesses can expect intense competition for funding.

· It is normal for small businesses not to earn a profit in the first two years.

· The number one reason that small businesses fail is because they did not have enough working capital to survive the first two years of operation.

Have you realistically considered both the advantages and disadvantages of owning and operating your own business? If not, the time to do so is before, not after, you have committed yourself.

This document provides information on the most common federal, state and local requirements to begin business operations. It is impossible to list all of the requirements for every type of business – you are strongly encouraged to contact the resource providers listed in this document for detailed information and assistance.

Before you take any steps to register your business, we recommend that you begin by reading the publication “Starting a New Business in Missouri” which can be found at: http://www.missouribusiness.net/startup/

LOCAL REQUIREMENTS

Contact with local (county, city, or township) government agencies early in the planning stages of your business is very important. This contact will provide you with information that is essential to your business operation including local licensure, zoning and permitting requirements.

Most cities, and some counties, require businesses to be licensed. Check with the city clerk (if your business will be located with the city limits) and/or the county clerk for the requirements in your community and county. The City Clerk can be contacted at 417-673-4651. The County Clerk can be contacted at 417-358- 0416.

It is also important that you check with your city/county Planning and Zoning office (417-673-6297) to make sure that the location you have selected for your new business is zoned appropriately for your business activity. If the proposed site is not in compliance, you must apply for a permit to change the current zoning. Some communities have specific limitations on home-based businesses.

If you plan to build a new building or alter an existing building, a building permit will be required.

For more information on the requirements to start and operate a business in Jasper County, please contact:

Jasper County Clerk’s Office, County Courthouse

Carthage, MO 64836

417-358-0416

As you proceed through the process of start-ing your business, use the following checklist as a guide to make sure that you have cov-ered all the requirements for starting your business.

ESSENTIAL CONSIDERATIONS:

Prepare a written business plan, includ-ing a marketing plan.

Estimate your start-up costs.

Select an attorney and accountant.

Obtain local business licenses through the city or county government.

Check on local zoning ordinances, regu-lations, building permits and fire codes through the city or county government.

Determine whether your business re-quires a state or federal license or permit to operate. Also check on state or federal regulations that may affect your specific type of business.

Select a banking institution and open a business account.

Select your business fiscal year.

Register your business with the Missouri Secretary of State by determining the legal structure of your business (sole proprietorship, partnership, limited partnership, limited liability company, or corporation) and file necessary forms and paperwork with the Secretary of State’s Office. Forms and online registration options can be found on the web at: www.sos.mo.gov Information on the ad-vantages and disadvantages of each legal structure is available at: www.missouribusiness.net/startup

Depending on your business structure:

Corporations must hold an organizational meeting to adopt by-laws, elect Board of Directors and corporate members, managers and/or officers, etc.

An LLC holds an organization meeting to adopt operating agreement, distribute membership certificates, elect company members and/or managers.

If forming an S Corporation, file IRS Form #2553 with the IRS within 75 days. Visit www.irs.gov/businesses for more information on forming a Sub Chapter S Corporation.

Most businesses will require a Federal Identification Number (EIN). Available from the IRS at www.irs.gov/businesses/index.html. Select “Employer ID” and then follow the instructions to apply online (IRS Form SS-4).

The Missouri Department of Revenue and the Missouri Division of Employment Security offer a co-registration site that allows you to register for and obtain several key numbers (e.g., Sales Tax, Employer ID, etc.) through one registration. This “co-registration” site is found at: https://dors.mo.gov/tax/coreg/index.jsp

You will need to apply for a sales tax number and/or use tax if you will be selling at retail or wholesale. Registration and more information is available from the Missouri Department of Revenue at www.dor.mo.gov/tax/business/

If hiring employees:

Determine the wage and hour laws from the state and federal government;

Obtain report to determine liability status (unemployment tax) with the state;

Check the requirements on Worker’s Compensation Insurance with the state;

Have each employee complete an I-9 Em-ployment Eligibility Verification Form www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/

Contact an insurance agent regarding fire, accident, liability, theft, and other types of commercial insurance.

Find out how OSHA laws affect your business www.osha.gov/

​Retail Trade Area (RTA) Population - 2015 Estimates

5 Mile Radius 68,205

10 Mile Radius 94,769

15 Mile Radius 102,050

Joplin MSA 177,211

RTA Race Distribution

Caucasion 93,518

Black 2,693

Indian 1,365

Asian 884

Islander 205

Other 1,241

Two or more 3,340

RTA Veteran Population

Webb City 886

5 Mile Radius 4,884

10 Mile Radius 6,646

15 Mile Radius 7,153

Joplin MSA 12,892

Age Distribution - 2015 Estimates

Webb City Median Age….............32.4

Webb City Average Age…............36.1

5 Mile Radius Average Median Age…............36.2

10 Mile Radius Average Median Age…............36.0

15 Mile Radius Average Median Age….............38.5

Joplin MSA…............37.5

Webb City Age Distribution

9 years & younger…............1,920

10 - 19…............1,675

20 - 24…............865

25 - 34…............1,645

35 - 44…............1,391

45 - 54…............1,351

55 - 64…............1,043

65 & older…............1,275

RTA Age Distribution

9 years & younger…............16,177

10 - 19…............13,512

20 - 24…............8,129

25 - 34…............14,386

35 - 44…............12,190

45 - 54…............12,841

55 - 64…............10,817

65 & older…............13,998

Income - 2015 Estimates

Webb City Median Household $37,854

5 Mile Radius Average Median Household 46,472

10 Mile Radius Average Median Household 43,450

15 Mile Radius Average Median Household 44,180

Joplin MSA Average Median Household 41,927

​Webb City Sales Tax Revenue

2016…............$4,214,198

2015…............$4,591,521

2014…............$4,314,183

2013…............$4,243,762

2012…............$4,844,625

RTA Sales Tax Revenue

2015…............$51,749,435

2014…............$47,775,478

2013…............$47,468,494

2012…............$49,744,333

​Educational Attainment - 2015 Estimates

High School Graduate or Higher Bachelor’s Degree or Higher

Webb City 86.1% 15.8%

5 Mile Radius (average %) 86.1% 20.0%

10 Mile Radius 84.9% 20.6%

15 Mile Radius 85.0% 20.3%

Joplin MSA 85.4% 19.9%

Economic Development

• Ideally located for those with transportation needs.

• More than 1000 acres of prime commercial real estate, available for development is located along the U.S. 171 and South Madison/Range Line corridors.

• Highway 249 interchange access with East/West highway access by Interstate 44 and Highway 171 giving a Webb City manufacturer/entrepreneur easy transportation
access in all directions.

• Immediately to the west sits the Joplin Airport.

• Webb City boasts a well-trained workforce with a solid work ethic that has been praised by those who have invested in the city.

• Reasonable utility rates are a plus for large and small operations.

• Pro-business city government.

The Chamber and the City’s Economic & Community Development Office work hand in hand to assist business owners and those who wish to establish businesses in Webb City. Whether it is a small venture or large manufacturer the city and chamber are ready to assist.

Joplin Regional Partnership
Webb City is a member of this 7 county partnership that markets the region for the purpose of business attraction. They identify and help companies evaluating locations for relocation or expansion. The JRP provides site selection assistance, tax and business incentive information, connections to important contacts for the region, business data and access to helpful resources for workforce recruitment and training. For more information, www.joplinregionalpartnership.com or 417-624-4150

Contact:

Carl Francis, City Administrator at 417-673-4651, cfrancis@webbcity.org

Or Erin Turner, Economic & Community Coordinator at 417-673-1154, eturner@webbcity.org

Centennial Park - Webb City’s 300 acre Commercial Park

Prime destination located in the center of America and Missouri’s fourth largest metropolitan area.

Perfect destination for retail and commercial development

Pro-business city government with attractive incentive packages

Dynamic enterprise zone with a qualified workforce

Low and Reasonable tax and utility rates for small and large enterprises

Outstanding school system with citizens full of civic pride

Rich and unique community with a nationally recognized historic district

We are known by the companies we keep & attract:

Est.

Webb Corporation 1881

BEI (Bill’s Electric, Inc.) 1945

Cardinal Scale 1950

Tateho Ozark Technical Ceramics 1986


Major Employers

Webb City R-VII School District, Education

BEI, Inc., Electrical Contractor

Cardinal Scale Mfg. Co., Industrial Scales

Wal-Mart Store, Retail

Webb City Health and Rehabilitation, Long and Short Term Care Facility

City of Webb City, Government

White Flyer, Division of Reagent Chemical, Clay Pigeons

Easy Living, Assisted Living

Tamko Engineering (Tamko Roofing), Roofing products

Atwoods, Retail

Missouri Metal Recycling, Recycling

Bemis, Packaging

Don’s Cold Storage, Cold and Freezer storage facility

C & M Machining, LLC, Machine shop

New businesses, Relocations &/or Expansions 2015 to present…

24 Elite Gym

Route 66 Bar & Restaurant

ACJ International, LLC

Angel Cakes

AT & T Authorized Dealer

Burger King

Burgess Insurance & Financial Services

CheeZies Pizza

Dollar Tree

Don’s Cold Storage & Transportation, LLC

Embassy Embroidery

Freeman Health System

Gifts from Lane 184

Hagler Auto Spa

Hickam State Farm Insurance & Financial

JE Auto Sales

Little Bit Vintage

Lynne’s Artsy Bakery

New Macaroo Gyms, LLC

Orient Express

SOAR Trampoline Park

Wig N Out

DON’T’ FORGET TO:

Attend a Starting a Small Business: The First Steps Workshop held monthly by the Small Business Development Center, MSSU, 417-625-3128, www.mssutraining.com.

Obtain business insurance

Join a professional association or organization (e.g., Chamber of Commerce)

You may need to make quarterly estimated income tax payments to the IRS and/or self -employment tax payments.

File annual tax information for state and federal government.

Keep a good set of business records and retain records as legally required.

Home and Business Growth

Webb City’s business friendly climate has resulted in new businesses locating in the city. New home growth and an expanding school system demonstrate the confidence in the city. A fast growing community with an outstanding school system and high civic pride, Webb City is a prime destination for those who want to establish a new enterprise in a city of outstanding potential. Taxes are extremely low to encourage entrepreneurs to make Webb City their business home. Manufacturers will enjoy the advantages of a dynamic enterprise zone as well as state incentives for providing jobs and investment.

One last thing…

Many businesses are required to obtain special licenses or permits to operate or conduct specific business activities.

Some examples: In addition to requiring health professions such as doctors, dentists, etc. to be licensed, Missouri also requires barbers and beauticians, tattoo artists, architects, landscapers, and many others to be li-censed. Refer to the Division of Professional Registration for specific requirements: http://www.pr.mo.gov/

Any establishment serving food to the public must meet health standards. Contact your local County Health Department for local regulations.

The Missouri Dept. of Agriculture inspects all scales.

The Dept. of Natural Resources issues permits related to waste and water sys-tems.

For more information on business and occupation licenses and permits, contact one of the resource providers listed in this document or visit America’s Career InfoNet website at www.acinet.org/acinet/licensedoccupations.

You will also find profiles, which contain information on regulations and requirements, for many different small businesses at: http://www.missouribusiness.net/

Webb City Department Staff Contacts:

Lynn Ragsdale, Mayor

Carl Francis, City Administrator

Don Melton, Police Chief

Andrew Roughton, Fire Chief

Erin Turner, Economic & Community Development Coordinator

*Data sources: uscensus.gov; Missouri Department of Revenue; City of Webb City; suburbanstats.org, Joplin Market Assessment by Retail Attractions LLC

​Webb City Mural

100 N. Main

This 30-foot oil painted mural depicts 100 years of Webb City history and is on permanent display inside one of the city’s oldest businesses, Mid-Missouri Bank, and can be viewed during business hours.

​Route 66 Mural

101 W. Daugherty

This mural highlights places along Route 66 and is located on the east side of the Bruner Pharmacy building. The mural was painted by artist John Biggs.

Webb City Public Library

101 S. Liberty / 417-673-4326

The Webb City Public Library is one of the few Andrew Carnegie libraries still being used. The new addition to the library building blends well with the original structure. The building exterior has samples of the lead and zinc mined in this area. The interior has beautiful stained glass windows that are a must-see to Webb City residents and visitors alike.

Route 66 Movie Theater

24 S. Main Street / 417-673- 1155

A renovated, nostalgic theater from the era of Route 66. Great affordable family entertainment.

​Route 66 Lakeside Mural

112 W. Broadway

Located inside the Route 66 Welcome Center / Chamber of Commerce offices, artist John Biggs portrayed vintage automobiles and motorcycles in a rural setting just east of Webb City along Route 66. Of special interest in the Lakeside Route 66 Mural is the bridge constructed in 1922. The 8-foot by 16-foot mural is a great photo opportunity for Route 66 tourists and Webb City visitors.

​Mount Hope Cemetery

3700 Range Line Road

An outdoor chapel and Veteran’s Memorial inscribed with the names of 77 Missouri Congressional Medal of Honor recipients is located on the grounds of this cemetery.

​Webb City Farmers Market Mural

Broadway & Main Street on the wall of the Middlewest Building

Lead muralist Kyle McKenzie, a Webb City native, raised donations for the project through Kickstarter. The mural, on the north wall of the MIddlewest Building at Main and Broadway Streets, depicts a moment when the market is being set up, before the shoppers arrive. It shows a large grassy field leading into the market pavilion, where vendors are unloading their goods. Also included are the Children’s Community Garden and the bell that is rung to signal the market’s opening. He sought input on the design from farmers market vendors and shoppers, and invited volunteers to help paint the mural.

​The Clubhouse Museum

115 N. Madison, Tours by appointment contact (417) 673-5866

In 1910 the clubhouse was the home of the Southwest Missouri Electric Railway Company, the museum now houses a Webb City Historic Museum.

Public Works Building

1060 N. Madison, Webb City, Missouri

(417) 673-6297

Street, Storm water, Electrical, Water, Inspections & Building, Occupancy and Sign Permit information can be found at this location.

The Public Works Department provides a wide array of services that make life safe and comfortable for the residents and businesses of Webb City. These services include water distribution, wastewater removal and treatment, street and alley construction and maintenance, snow removal, and storm water management. The Code Enforcement division issues permits, conducts building and construction inspections, and ensures the safety of our community through the enforcement of the Municipal Code. In addition, the department supervises and maintains the city cemeteries.

The City’s water, wastewater and stormwater programs are operated under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) permits granted by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Webb City Public Works Department

1060 N. Madison

Webb City MO 64870

Phone: 417-673-6297

Fax: 417-673-6294

Storm Water Department

Russell Ball, Storm Water Manager

417-673-6297

rball@webbcity.org

The City of Webb City has a stormwater division that strives to create and maintain a safe environment during and after precipitation events.

As our Asset Control Coordinator, Russell Ball, collects data which helps keep precipitation runoff safe and effective. In order to have a comprehensive stormwater plan, we must be able to identify and locate city assets using GIS (Geographic Information System). These assets include signs, hydrants, water meters, culverts, ditches, sewer manholes, etc. The EPA has 6 requirements that must be followed in order to have a proper stormwater program:

1. Public education and outreach

2. Public participation and involvement

3. Illicit discharge detection and elimination

4. Construction site runoff controls

5. Post-construction site runoff controls

6. Pollution prevention and good housekeeping

Russell also assists the code enforcement officer with storm water-related and other issues. If you have any questions, please contact Russell Ball at 417-673-6297 or email Russell at rball@webbcity.org Anytime it rains, water falls onto many different surfaces, and depending on the surface, it either enters the ground, or runs off to another location. For instance, if rain falls on grass, a portion soaks into the ground, but if it lands on a paved parking lot, it runs off the lot to another location. Within Webb City, much of the stormwater runs off of driveways, parking lots, and streets, where it picks up oil, grease, sediments, and many other pollutants that are harmful to the environment. What many people do not realize is this stormwater that washes down our streets, flows into storm drains and then flows directly to our ponds, creeks, and rivers. When this stormwater flow becomes polluted with eroded soils, automotive fluids, trash, and lawn chemicals, it affects our ability to use our water bodies for drinking and recreational purposes and it degrades fish and other aquatic habitats. The only way to lessen this pollution is to reduce the amount of pollutants washed away by storm water.

Did You Know…

The City’s storm water drainage system is separate from the sanitary sewer system (indoor sinks, toilets, etc). The sanitary sewer system drains to the wastewater treatment plant while the storm water system drains to area streams.

What is Storm Water Pollution?

Any toxic discharge that enters into the storm water sewer system , as storm water flows (or snow melts), it picks up debris, chemicals - such as fertilizers and pesticides - dirt, cigarette butts and other pollutants. This discharge enters a storm sewer system and is discharged to a lake, stream, river, wetland, or coastal water.

Improving Storm Water Quality

Residents can help alleviate stormwater pollution in several ways:

Practice dry cleanup methods when cleaning your driveway or sidewalk. By using a broom instead of a hose, debris will be prevented from entering storm drain inlets and eventually streams. Also, use cat litter to soak up leaked oil, which can be then thrown away in the trash once dry.

Have your soil tested. A soil test is an inexpensive and informative way to determine the quality of your soil. The laboratory will test soil pH, nutrient content, and percentage of organic matter. From these results, you can determine exactly what nutrients your lawn and garden need, which will help minimize the use of chemicals which can runoff into streams.

Use phosphorus-free lawn fertilizers. Phosphorus runoff from lawns is washed into streams and lakes, where it encourages algae growth. But only newly-seeded lawns or phosphorus-deficient soils (as indicated by testing) require phosphorus. When buying lawn fertilizer, look for the three numbers on the bag and choose products where the middle number is zero. This indicates that the fertilizer does not contain phosphorus (the other numbers indicated the amount of nitrogen and potassium, respectively).

When painting, do not rinse brushes off in the lawn or dump extras into storm drains. Instead, rinse brushes and rollers off in a sink or tub, and drop your extra paint off at the household hazardous waste facility for reuse.

Clean up immediately after your pets and throw the waste into the trash or in the toilet. Otherwise, disease causing pathogens in the waste can be transferred directly into streams.

Dispose of lawn waste in compost piles and use a mulching mower. Never place leaves or other lawn debris in waterways because it will cause a decrease in oxygen in waterways, killing fish.

Reduce the amount of paved area and increase the amount of vegetated area in your yard. Use native plants in your landscaping to reduce the need for watering during dry periods. Consider directing downspouts away from paved surfaces onto lawns and other measures to increase infiltration and reduce polluted runoff.

Do not wash cars, RVs, or boats at home because the detergent laden water runs into storm drains and then into creeks. Remember, soap destroys dirt and organisms, it will do the same in creeks. Instead, go to a full or self serve car wash because the water used there is cleaned in a waste water treatment plant.

Report any illegal dumping into storm drainage inlets, such as soil running off of construction sites into drains, or falling septic systems.

Adopt a storm drain in your neighborhood by yourself or with neighbors, and take turns cleaning away debris from it after storm events.

Do not drain your swimming pool, spa water, or filter back flush water directly into a storm drain. Direct this water into the sanitary sewer or allow it to overland flow to a storm inlet after it has been dechlorinated.

Report-A-Polluter

Spilling, dumping, or discharging chemicals, dirt, debris, oil or other non-storm water substances into ditches, creeks, streams, curb drains, storm drains, or the river is a violation of federal, state, and local regulations. Allowing sediment or chemicals to wash off a construction site is also a violation. If you have witnessed an act that you feel is a violation of clean water regulations, anywhere within the city limits, please report the activity to the City Public Works Department at 417-673-6297

If calling after regular business hours 
(M-F, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) and the problem requires 
immediate attention, please call 673-1911.

NPDES

The City of Webb City is required to have and comply with a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for its stormwater drainage system, known as a Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System(MS4). This permit requires the City to administer a storm water management program to address the potential for discharges from the MS4 to negatively impact area waterways by reducing both pollutants in

Storm Water Fact Sheets

Projects you can do

Wastewater Department

The City of Webb City wastewater collection system consists of a total of 63 miles of pipe, 9 lift stations, and over 1000 manholes. This vital infra-structure is put in place to maintain sanitary conditions for the important residents of our city. This entire system has recently had its assets physical location and elevation recorded by a sophisticated GPS (Global Position System) unit so that this information can be added to a GIS (Geographic Information System) data base.This data base which includes electronic mapping will be invaluable to assist the waste water department in quickly finding covered manholes, and designing future main line replacements, and extensions of the collection system.

The wastewater collections department consists of a five man crew who professionally serve the residents by maintaining the system in the best possible condition they can. Their assignments are to inspect, clean, replace, and maintain our collection system. The crew is able to perform these duties respectively along with responding to emergency calls, and replacing broken down sections of sewer pipe. The crew utilizes several pieces of equipment to accomplish these great tasks which includes: a powerful rodding machine to break up tough roots, a powerful water powered jet truck, that also has a large 10 inch vacuum hose that cleans the lines and clears clogs of small roots and grease, a remote controlled camera to travel inside of sewer mains to inspect, and record the conditions of pipes, and manholes for cracks. To replace, and install new sewer mains the crew has procured a backhoe, an excavator, and two dump trucks. Under the direction of Director William Runkle this important work is orchestrated by Superintendent: John Pottorff, and Foreman: Darren Chitwood, along with three laborers. Between both Darren and John they have over 55 years experience in the construction and utility industries. John has worked in both the construction, and municipal industries; Darren has worked in construction, municipal, and private sector utility industry for 30+ years.

This invaluable crew was assembled to help re mediate one of the greatest challenges of collection systems everywhere across the country; caused by an aging infrastructure, and old outdated plumbing practices of the time. This challenge has an acronym called SSO’s and it stands for Sanitary Sewer Overflow; an unsanitary situation where, during high rain events, some singular locations in the system cannot fully contain both the waste water and rain water. During an SSO, the water will surcharge, or overflow through a manhole. This event is primarily caused by a situation with another acronym - I&I which stands for Inflow & Infiltration. Inflow is caused from storm water drains being connected to the sanitary sewer system instead of being connected to a separate storm water system. Infiltration is caused by pipes 50 to 100 years old or more, that are cracked and broken down which allows ground water to enter in to the collection system. During a rain event you could see how this could present a very big problem. Because of the potential public health hazard, residents are strongly encouraged to call the wastewater department if they witness water discharging from a manhole.

We also contract with specialized companies who can install a permanent liner inside of the sewer main in areas where it makes more sense to line vs. digging the main up and replacing it. These are the more congested areas and where the sewer main is extremely deep in the ground.

For questions or concerns about our wastewater system please call 673-6297.

Staff listing with email addresses and photos

Water Distribution Department

The City strives to keep and maintain clean, safe drinking water. With a 4-member water crew, (3 hold state DS3 (Distribution System 3) licensing, 3 have state Class C (Water Treatment) licensing), the Public Works Water Department constructs new lines and maintains the city-wide water system. Hydrants are flushed on a regular basis by both the water department and fire department crews to help keep stagnant water from building in the lines. Chlorine is added to the lines to help keep bacteria from forming.

The city employs an electronic monitoring system, SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition), that transmits tower water levels, chlorine levels and PH levels to a central computer located in the Public Works building to help better maintain higher-quality drinking water.

If you have questions about your water bill, please call 417-673-4651

For questions about the water system or if you see a water leak, please call 417-673-6297

Street Department

As Street & Water Utilities Director, Rick Roth oversees the construction and maintenance of approximately 72 miles of Webb City Streets. Many people think only of paving when it comes to street maintenance. However, actual maintenance of the streets includes sweeping, weed control, crack sealing, spot repairs, as well as asphalt overlays. During the winter months our crews work around the clock when necessary to clear snow and ice for those needing to drive during inclement weather. Budgetary and other resource constraints limit the number of miles of streets that can be addressed for major repairs in any given year. Typically, over the last two decades, most major street repairs have been subcontracted to large paving companies. However, the City is in the process of acquiring equipment and training that will permit our own crews to do much more and, therefore, more efficiently utilize precious tax payer dollars.

Eddie Kreighbaum is the Construction Superintendent for the City. He oversees all the construction ventures the City is in connection with, as well he is responsible for the Street Dept. employees and their work projects. Eddie served for years as the Building Inspector/Code Enforcement Officer, and still oversees that department. Eddie can be reached at ekreighbaum@webbcity.org Becky Eckler is the Administrative Secretary for Public Works. Her job duties are too many to list! If you need Building Permits, Planning and
Zoning Variance Forms, Etc. call or email Becky: beckler@webbcity.org (417) 673-6297. Robert Gordon is Water Superintendent for the city, and has worked for the city in one capacity or another for well over 30 years! He can be reached at (417) 673-6297 or rgordon@webbcity.org Citizens with Questions or concerns about particular streets or water issues may contact Rick Roth, Becky Eckler, or Robert Gordon at (417)673-6297.

Code Enforcement

Eddie Kreighbaum is the Chief Building Inspector/Code Enforcement Officer as well as Construction Superintendent. Eddie can be reached at417-673-6297 or by e-mail at ekreighbaum@webbcity.org. Along with Russell Ball’s StormWater Management duties, Russell also is a Code Enforcement Officer and can answer questions. rball@webbcity.orgTina Taylor is the Permits Clerk for the City. She compiles the necessary paperwork for the Planning and Zoning Board, as well as the Board of
Appeals. Tina can be reached at ttaylor@webbcity.org

View our city codes here

Cemeteries

Webb City maintains two cemetery’s; Wild Rose and the Webb City Cemetery. The city employs a full-time crew to keep our cemetery’s beautiful for a more pleasant visit. Below are the prices for cemetery lots:

Single lot price-

Current resident of Webb City $200.00

Non-resident of Webb City $250.00

Five lots purchased at one time @ 12% discount

Grave opening- Mon thru Fri 8:00 am to 3:00pm $300.00

After 3:00 pm and Weekends additional charge $400.00 plus $50.00 per hour

Grave markers $0.20 per square inch

Disinterment $500.00

Cremation $75.00

For more information please call the Public Works office at: 417-673-6297

Permits and Inspections

To help keep homes and environments safe, the City of Webb City requires for various permits to be obtained. Examples of these include, but not limited to, Building, Historical Building, Sign, Occupancy, Roofing, Siding, Demolition and Electrical. Inspections are required by our building inspector and the requirements are available from the Public Works office. After completing permit paperwork at the Public Works building (110 E Church) payment can be made and your permit will be issued after review of the Code Enforcement Officer. Please allow up to 48 hours for processing.

Click here for your Permit Applications and Forms, which can be printed and turned in to the Public
Works Building at 110 E Church. We Accept most major credit cards.

Webb City, Missouri is a gem of the Ozarks. The city defies national trends in that it continues to grow and prosper. Webb City’s business friendly climate has resulted in new businesses being established throughout the entire community.

New home growth and an expanding school system demonstrate the confidence in the city. Rapid population growth, an outstanding school system and citizens full of civic pride makes Webb City a prime destination for those who to establish a new enterprise in a city of outstanding potential. Taxes are extremely low to encourage entrepreneurs to make Webb City their business home. Manufacturers will enjoy the advantages of a dynamic enterprise zone with a qualified workforce as well as many State incentives for providing jobs and investment.

In addition to the heavily traveled Madison Avenue business district, the city has a highly unique downtown area. In July of 2014, the Downtown Webb City Historic District was placed in the National Register of Historic Places. Due to this designation and the newly establishment of the city-owned Centennial Park, investors are bringing their restaurants and small businesses to the downtown area. The Nationally recognized Downtown Webb City Historic District along with available property within Centennial Park, slated for retail development, will allow the city to offer incentives to those who wish to be a part of or near a nationally listed historic district.

Since the D.R.E.A.M. city designation by the State of Missouri in 2008, the City of Webb City’s economic and community development efforts have been increased considerably. D.R.E.A.M. stands for Downtown Revitalization and Economic Assistance for Missouri, an initiative based on the collaboration of three Missouri State agencies: The Missouri Department of Economic Development, Development Finance Board and Housing Development Commission. Only ten cities in Missouri receive this designation each year.

The Route 66 Welcome Center, located at the corner of Webb and Broadway streets, houses the Chamber of Commerce and the city’s Economic and Community Development offices. These two entities work hand in hand to assist business owners and those who wish to establish businesses in Webb City, the city and the chamber are ready to assist whether it is a small venture or large manufacturer. The tourism created by Route 66 and the city’s emphasis on that tourism allow business owners to cater to both the tourism patron as well as a local customer base.

Webb City is ideally located for those with transportation needs. More than 300 acres of prime commercial real estate is available for retail and commercial development along U.S. Highway 171. The Highway 249 bypass interchange empties on to the eastern boundary of the city. Immediately to the west sits the Joplin Regional Airport. Interstate 44 giving Webb City manufacturers or entrepreneurs easy transportation access in all directions provides East/West highway access by air, rail and road. Webb City boasts a well-trained workforce with a solid work ethic that has been praised by those who have invested in the city. Reasonable utility rates are a plus, as well, for large and small operations.

The city points with pride to existing successful businesses such as Cardinal-Detecto Scale Manufacturing Company. A local startup company, it is a world leader in the manufacturing of small as well as the largest industrial scales with sales to more than 225 countries.

Webb City today is a thriving community that continues to embrace its rich heritage while embracing the endless possibilities of the future. The city’s long history and commitment to economic growth makes Webb City an ideal location to live, work, stay and play!

Webb City High School provides students with an excellent education in a safe and caring environment. The entirety of the Webb City School System facilitates opportunities for students to learn and excel to the highest level academically, while also providing outlets for success in the performing arts and athletic programs. Community support has long been a hallmark of the Webb City R-VII School System. By working together, students will be well prepared to be successful in society and to perform to their fullest potential.

Highlights and Successes
• Student achievement scores in the top 10% in the state
• Tornado shelters located at every attendance center
• Technology advances at the High School and across the District
• Implementation of bully prevention efforts
• District-wide lowest tax rate of adjacent school districts
• Refinanced debt saves more than $1M in interest costs
• Improvements to school security
• Improved communication with patrons
• Improved grading system for more accurate reflection of student learning

These efforts support the educational mission of the District, which is “to prepare today’s youth to meet the challenges of tomorrows world by guiding all students in the acquisition of knowledge and development of skills that will enable each to become productive responsible individuals.”

Enrollment statistics
96% Rate of pupil attendance
4,327 Enrolled students 2015-2016
189 Preschool enrollment
93.4% High School graduation rate

Staff & District Highlights
220 District ratio of students to administrators
11.2 Professional staff average years of experience
19 Students per classroom
43.8% Teachers hold a Master’s Degree or higher
325 Certified Employees
250 Classified Employees
984.5 Volunteer hours logged during school hours

Crowder College-Webb City Campus
It is the mission of Crowder College to offer students access to quality education. The branch campus in Webb City is a convenient location for students who live or work near Webb City. Students can complete their entire Associate degree in a variety of programs including: Business Administration, Criminal Justice, Fire Science, General Studies (undecided), Graphic Design, History, Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA), Pre-Nursing, Psychology, Social Work, and Teacher Education. Students enrolled in other associate degree programs can complete their general education classes in Webb City too. Certificate options include Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA) and Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). Flexible class scheduling provides busy students the opportunity to take classes during the day, twilight, or evening.

Students who graduate from A+ accredited high schools can use their A+ benefits at Crowder in Webb City. The A+ program currently pays for a student’s tuition and common fees such as lab fees and facility use fees.

Some of the benefits of attending Crowder College in Webb City include:
• Experienced, friendly staff trained to provide financial aid assistance, placement testing, academic advising, and enrollment assistance
• Instructors highly qualified and experienced in the courses they teach
• Small class size, on average 20 students, allows instructors greater opportunity to interact with students
• Free tutoring is provided to all students in most subject areas

Expanding Opportunities for Education
Crowder College has expanded in Webb City adding a 22,000 square foot academic building, named Dawson-Spencer Hall, to its current location. The new building which opened Fall 2014 includes new classrooms, a science lab, and space for a new Occupational Therapy Assistant program. The new building also includes a 9,000 square foot tornado safe room. This safe room provides students, staff, and community residents protection from dangerous storms.

The Webb City Campus is located at 600 S. Ellis. For more information and to see a listing of courses offered in Webb City, log on to the website www.crowder.edu or call 417-673-2345.

Missouri Southern State University
Each semester at Missouri Southern State University represents a new chance to make the grade by serving students while striving to advance the importance of higher education in region – and the 2016-17 school year is no different.

For students interested in entering the field of medicine, the Yours to Lose – Advanced Medical School Acceptance Program is an opportunity to gain early admission to Kansas City University’s new medical school in Joplin, MO. The program allows up to 25 students – and up to 15 alternates – to be admitted to the medical school at the same times as their admission to Missouri Southern. They will earn their bachelor’s degree in biology in three years and then begin their first year of medical school.

As a part of meeting the needs of those students and others, they have undertaken a major renovation project in Reynolds Hall, which houses biology, mathematics and physical and chemical science departments. The $17.5 million project will include a three-story addition that will house additional classroom space.

Missouri Southern is also offering a new bachelor’s degree in geography, while the social work program has doubled in size for the start of its second year. New master’s degrees are also available in management and teach-education-administration.

As always, it’s a time of new beginnings, new challenges and new opportunities. For more information, visit www.mssu.edu.

Bess Truman Elementary

800 State Highway D

Webb City, MO 64870

(417) 673-6055​

​Carterville Elementary School

210 E. Hall

Carterville, MO 64835

(417) 673-6080

​Eugene Field Elementary School

510 S. Oronogo

Webb City, MO 64870

(417) 673-6040

​Harry S. Truman Elementary School

810 State Highway D

Webb City, MO 64870

(417) 673-6085

​Madge T. James Kindergarten Center

211 W. Aylor Street

Webb City, MO 64870

(417) 673-6075

Mark Twain Elementary School

1427 W. Aylor​

Webb City, MO 64870

(417) 673-6060

​Webster Elementary School

704 N. Main Street

Webb City, MO 64870

(417)673-6060

Webb City Middle School

​Webb City Middle School

603 W. Aylor Street

Webb City, MO 64870

(417)673-6045

Webb City Junior High School

807 W 1st Street

Webb City, MO 64870

(417) 673-6030​

​Webb City High School

621 N. Madison

Webb City, MO 64870

(417) 673-6010

photograph by: Streight Shots Photography

Webb City is a great place for family and business to grow. The population growth from 2000 (9,812) to 2005 (11,365) represents an increase of 15.8%. With mostly mild temperatures, average rainfall and steady growth rate, Webb City is above-average for cities of it’s size in the state of Missouri.

Population: 11,365

Male 5,395

Female 5,970

Median age (years) 31.7

Under 5 years 954

6 years to 17 years 949

18 years and over 8,013

65 years and over 1,449

Household Population 11,246

Average family size 3.11

Total housing units 4,652

Median home value $72,400

Median family income (1999) $36,006

Route 66 Event Center

Webb City Spaces for Rent

The Clubhouse

- located at 115 N Madison Ave, is owned by the Webb City Historical Society. Two rooms on the first floor, one large room on the second floor and a commercial kitchen are available for rent. Each first floor room is large enough to seat up to 35 people. The rental rate is $40 for one first floor room, $70 for two first floor rooms and $150 for the first and second floor rooms. Rentals are per day from 9 a.m. to midnight. The newly renovated building was originally built as the Clubhouse for the employees of the Southwest Missouri Electric Railroad. This is the perfect place for small gatherings and larger receptions in an historic setting. For reservation information, contact Eileen Nichols at 673-5866 or 417-483-8139.

The Mining Days Community Building - Located in King Jack Park is ideal for larger gatherings with seating for over 100 diners. The newly constructed facility boasts a commercial kitchen, a meeting area of 2,400 square feet, and expansive views of the park. For reservation and fee information, contact 673-4651.

The Amphitheater - Located adjacent to the Mining Days Community Building and features a covered raised stage. Seating for 350 can be expanded to 650 by using the lawns. For reservation and fee information, contact 673-4651.

Route 66 Events Center, 21 S Webb, can seat up to 150 diners and 300 theater style. For reservation and fee information contact 673-4651.

Webb City Senior Center - 210 Pennsylvania Ave., can seat up to 125 persons in its newly remodeled dining room. For rental costs and more information, contact 673-1876.

Granny Shaffer’s Restaurant – at 2728 N. Range Line, has three rooms available for private use. The Route 66 room seats up to 20 people. Granny’s Parlor seats up to 45. The Trolley Room seats up to 125. There is no room rental charge for the rooms if meals are ordered through the restaurant. For information, contact Mike Wiggins at 659-9393.

The Continental Banquet Center – Located just east of Granny Shaffer’s and can seat 175 diners. The space is suitable for receptions of up to 225. The center has a dance floor available and is licensed to serve liquor. An outdoor wedding venue is also available. There is no charge to use of the facility if catering is ordered through Continental Catering. For
information, contact Mike Wiggins at 659-9393.

Webb City Neighborhoods

Any Webb City local will gladly tell you that pleasant neighborhoods and friendly neighbors are a part of a rich hometown tradition. The school district’s fine reputation, the attraction of small town life, safe neighborhoods, almost non-existent crime and low cost of living all contribute to driving the demand for Webb City housing. A recent housing construction boom reflects the city’s growth in recent years.

A Webb City housing renaissance began in the late 1980’s with the creation of several new developments. There are currently many new housing developments in various stages of construction in Webb City and the surrounding areas. Older neighborhoods are also experiencing a new construction boom. In several locations throughout the city and in adjoining areas attractive new homes in beautifully planned settings brighten and highlight the quieter portions of town. In established neighborhoods, pride is evident as homeowners beautify and upgrade their properties.

The history of a town is often reflected in the architecture of its homes, and the Victorian homes, built in Webb City when the town was young, are testimony to the success enjoyed by the mine owners. Many of the homes are mammoth structures, rising three stories high. Many of these can be seen along Liberty, Pennsylvania and Ball Streets. The Webb House, home of the son of the city’s founder, is on the corner of Broadway and Liberty.

New multi-family complexes have been built in both the north and south sections of town. While much of the new housing and business development in Webb City is occurring south on Madison Avenue, new housing can be found northeast of the older parts of town, as well. The fact that Main Street still functions in spit of sprawling development is a healthy sign for the town.

Cardinal Valley Prairie/Wetlands Restoration Project

The habitat projects I am involved with are really two fold. There is the upland portions, where we are doing native prairie restoration work on, and then there is the wetland projects, where we will do wetland restoration using native plants.

The upland prairie restoration work has several objectives, first and foremost being to provide better habitat for wildlife. We are not just talking about the larger animals here either, such as deer, coyotes, rabbits, etc. We are also interested in the insects, small grassland dependent birds, amphibians and reptiles, along with those life forms living in the soil, such as worms, nematodes, bacteria, etc. These restorations will also protect the soil from eroding, while also improving absorption of water during rain events, helping to maintain ground water levels.

I mentioned that all wildlife is targeted for improvement of habitat, but there is also an emphasis on providing better monarch butterfly habitat as well. This involves providing a diversity of plants that are considered food sources by this species, both from a nectar and larvae feeding source. Milkweed species are an important component of this objective, so getting more milkweed species on these restoration sites is an important goal. Other species of insects will benefit as well, so it is a win-win scenario for many species! Most of us don’t have any idea of how important a lot of these native insects are, whether it be from pollination, or from controlling other pest species.

The wetland areas will also be managed from a native vegetation standpoint, being seeded, or planted, with native wetland species. The main goal of the wetlands is to have plants that remove a little more zinc from the contaminated water that is common around Webb City, but an important secondary goal is to provide wetland habitat for primarily wetland dependent bird species.

Currently, I have been managing around 100 acres that was previously planted by the EPA upon completion of the cleanup. We have tried to enhance the native vegetation that was on these sites, while trying to eliminate, or at least minimize, the unwanted (invasive) vegetation that was very prevalent on most sites. There are several hundred more acres to be planted in the near future, but those won’t be completed until the composting process is up and going. The finished product from the composting of wood chips, cattle manure, and
bio-solids from the treatment plant will be applied to the areas that are yet to be planted, to act as a topsoil, which will then be planted to the native grass and forb mixtures.

The long range plan, and I have no idea of what time frame is going to be involved in this, is to have walking trails going around and through much of these upland and wetland restoration sites, so the public can have opportunities to bird watch, see native forbs (wildflowers) blooming, or simply have a place to walk, or run, or possibly even ride a bicycle.

​Webb City Clubs & Organizations

Alpha Delta Kappa Teachers Sorority - Kathy Casella (417) 781-1080

Amarath - Praying Hands Court # 15 - Opal Anderson (417) 673-1435

American Legion Post 322 (417) 673-1474

Boy Scouts- Pack 29 - Charlie Tyndall (417) 673-5736

Troop 25 - Terry Nations (417) 673-2281

Route 66 Cruise Night (second Saturday each month April - Sept.) (417) 673-1154

City Park Reservations (417) 673-4651

Eastern Star - Janis Jackson (417) 673-3000

Webb City Elks Club #861 (417) 673-3671

Friends of the Library - Lisa Sweet (417) 673-3790

Friends of the Webb City Farmers Market (417) 673-5866

Girl Scouts (417) 623-8277

Gold & Silver Senior Club - Beverly Purcell (417) 413-4919

The Grubby Gardeners - Nancy Carlson (417) 673-5811

Historical Society - Ann Watrous (417) 629-8782

MO Governor’s Mounted Guard - Terry Quarles (417) 529-7706

Rotary - Bob Collier (417) 673-7078

SWMO Electric Railroad Association - Jerry Fisher (417) 850-1721

Veterans of Forgein Wars Post 7630 (417) 673-3181

Webb City Area Chamber of Commerce (417) 673-1154

Webb City Little League/ Softball / Soccer Club / Flag Football (417) 673-3700

Webb City Youth Basketball - Scott Hallacy (417) 438-2588

Webb City Youth Cheerleading Facebook/Webb City Youth Cheer

Webb City Youth Football - Jared Wilson (417) 317-7586 / webbcityyouthfootball.com

Webb City Youth Wrestling (417) 825-3796

Chamber Staff
    STAFF
  • Gwen Allen, Director of Membership Services
  • LeeAnn Crider, Administrative Assistant

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Sasha Rives, Stitch Space

Samantha Brownlow, Mid–Missouri Bank

Megan Sabo, Cardinal Scale Manufacturing Company

Scott Hutson, Route 66 Theater

Brian Massey, Edward Jones

ADVISORY BOARD

Jonathan Dawson, Immediate Past President
Brandon Wilson, Past President
Lynn Ragsdale, Mayor
Carl Francis, City Administrator
Erin Turner, Community Development Coordinator
Tony Rossetti, Superintendent, Webb City R7 School District
Mark Fitch, Crowder College
Lisa Robinson, MSSU Small Business & Technology Development Center
Tom Flanigan, Jasper County Commission

Kyle Hickam, State Farm, President

Sunday morning in Webb City finds much of its population in their place of worship. We are an ecumenical city, with 18 denominations represented. We have an active Ministerial Alliance and a strong appreciation of the need for a belief system as well as an appreciation for the important role faith plays in daily living.
The Praying Hands memorial, standing atop a hill in King Jack Park, illustrates the city’s sense of brotherhood.
The three largest religious groups in the region, in order, are Evangelical Protestant, Mainline Protestant and Catholic.

The denominations identified in the city include:
. Assembly of God
, Baptist
, Bible Baptist, Catholic
, Christian
, Christadelphian
, Church of God,. Full Gospel
, Independent Christian,
Methodist,. Nazarene, Pentecostal,. Presbyterian,. Community of Christ 

For more information, please call City Hall at 417-673-4651.

* Information included on this web page were found on the factfinder.census.gov web site and the Webb City Chamber of Commerce Web Site.

Central United Methodist Church

5 S Pennsylvania St

Webb City, MO 64870

417-673-4238

http://www.webbcitymethodist.com/​

Church of the Nazarene

701 W 10th St

Webb City, MO 64870

417-673-2764

http://webbcitynaz.com/

Christ’s Church of Oronogo

22415 Kafir Rd

Oronogo, MO 64855

417-673-3945

http://cco.church/

Destiny Church

3411 N Range Line Rd

Joplin, MO 64801

417-206-7400

http://www.mydestinychurch.com/​

Emmanuel Baptist Church

300 N Pennsylvania

Webb City, MO, 64870

417-673-2645

https://www.facebook.com/ebcwc/

First Baptist Church

102 N Roane St

Webb City, MO 64870

417-673-4655

http://fbcwebbcity.com/​

First Christian Church

219 S Webb Street

Webb City, MO 64870

417-673-2458

http://www.fccwebcity.org/

Frisco Church

102 N Roane

Webb City, MO 64870

417-673-3672

http://www.friscochurch.org/​

Contact

Contact Information

phone(417)673-4651
location200 S Main Street
Webb City, Missouri
64870
1443

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